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Our Impact This Year

  • People Helped

    600

  • Dollars Raised

    $85600

  • Program Participants

    100


Caregivers on the Homefront Mental Health and Wellness Restorative Weekend with Wounded Warrior Project- April 2021



PARTICIPANT INPUT ABOUT RESTORATIVE WEEKEND

  • I was able to open up about my current caregiver situation and touch on a lot of issues I had to deal with as a child, as it seems my life is going full circle. This week opened up some hidden issues and feelings that needed airing out, knowing my strengths also helped me in dealing with all of it. I found out that I am not the only person who has these emotions and problems-that right there was the best support I could have ever asked for. Thank you for making this weekend happen.

  • This weekend taught me that I cannot be there for everyone at 100 percent if I don't start being there for myself. I need to take time for my physical and mental health and be a better person from the inside to be a better person for those around me. I need to give myself love instead of only giving everyone around me love.

  • I had such an amazing time at the WWP and COH restorative weekend! They reiterated tools I haven’t used in awhile and also learned new tools. While it’s never easy talking about my trauma, it was effortless with this group. They’ve shown me that I AM worth enough to take care of myself by working through my traumas and that I’m worthy enough for a tribe. There was so much love and support before we were at the retreat, helping to ensure I had care for my veteran when it was cancelled 6 days previous. This was LIFE CHANGING for myself and my home. I’m forever grateful.

  • I signed up hoping to gain some information on reducing stress, managing a household with a wounded warrior, also tools for my daily life. I gained so much more. I had the opportunity to connect with other caregivers. We shared our stories and found we shared similar struggles as well. It was extremely validating. Problems that are ignored by many around us were understood in this space. Many of us lack a support system. I gained one at the retreat.
    The thing that stands out the most is we introduced ourselves at the beginning of the retreat. I think all of us could not describe ourselves without including our children and/or significant others. At the end of the retreat we all were able to say who we truly were. I am forever grateful to you for this. I changed so much in those four days. I came home feeling refreshed. I had the most productive day I’d had in a long time. My husband even made appointments to improve his mental health. I am no longer burnt out and I don’t feel such resentment.

  • It's very easy to forget that you aren't alone on this journey and this weekend helped remind me in a tangible way that while it may not be the exact same journey, we're all toiling up the same mountain. Probably the most significant thing was the time spent working on figuring out who we are as individuals, not as caregivers, wives, partners, mothers, employees, or workers. I learned that I have no idea who I am and I haven't known for a very long time. Instead I've thrown myself into my titles rather than figuring out my own identity. I've been home less than 24 hours, and my husband and my children have all observed that "Some of your spark is back." We, as caregivers, NEED these kinds of events in ways I can not even begin to explain. Just a few months ago a caregiver I know personally took their own life because they felt like they had no other option. Getting good, informed mental health care is incredibly difficult for caregivers. Events like this are a lifeline. I've been on the edge for months. This event helped me remember that my tribe is out there, maybe not here where I would like them to be, but in Pennsylvania and Ohio and Michigan and Indiana and New York. There is hope and you're not alone. Those are the two biggest takeaways for me from this weekend and I can honestly say, they may have saved my life.


News & Notes


Click Here to listen to how the Covid pandemic has affected caregivers. 


AMERICUS, Ga. (WALB) - Loved ones of military members and veterans now have new ways to learn to take care of themselves.

The Rosalynn Carter Institute (RCI) for Caregiving in Americus announced three new partnerships with organizations to help military caregivers.

AMERICUS, GEORGIA – At a time when many Americans are feeling isolated and disconnected, the Rosalynn Carter Institute is proud to partner with Caregivers on the Homefront, RallyPoint, and the American Red Cross Military and Veteran Caregiver Network (MVCN) to expand outreach to caregivers. Through these three exciting partnerships, RCI will provide virtual programming and tools to empower caregivers who support service members and veterans across the United States and around the world.

When things are busy, wellness often takes a backseat to our presumed priorities. Check out a few ways to bring your personal health back to the forefront of your life.

Meditation is powerful. If you’re still unsure whether or not the practice is worth trying, check out these top benefits of meditation and consider how they can help improve your life.



Our Donors

  • Lindia Jackson
    Lindia Jackson

    Lindia Jackson

  • Coalition to Support America's Heroes
    Coalition to Support America's Heroes
  • David Woods Kemper Veterans Foundation

    David Woods Kemper Veterans Foundation